May
21

Werner Mischke and The Global Gospel

written by JD

Strike the MatchThere is much in the Bible that addresses the topic of shame (referenced more than twice as often as the notion of guilt). This is good news as we labor among the 4 billion! For most of the world is not as individualistically-oriented as we in the West. Matters such as honor and shame affect daily life much more in the Majority World than here.

As we share the gospel, we often emphasize biblical passages related to guilt while overlooking those passages addressing honor and shame. And with the 4 billion primarily living in honor-shame societies, this means we have something to work on in our preaching.

Werner Mischke, Executive Vice President of Mission ONE, and I recently spoke about his new book on this topic: The Global Gospel: Achieving Missional Impact in our Multicultural World. Listen to our conversation.

The Global Gospel is a reminder that we in the West have much to learn about honor and shame which the New Testament world—and Majority World today—lived with on a daily basis. This book has influenced my understanding of the gospel and missions. I want to encourage you to get this book, read it, and make application to your life and ministry.

You may find Werner at his blog or at Mission One.

May
20

My Approach to Writing

written by JD

People periodically ask about my writing methodology. While I do not consider my approach the best or that I am a great writer, I do enjoy sharing what the Lord has taught me over the years. I am not a writing teacher, my grammar and speling ain’t great, and I don’t know all the comma, rules out there. However, I am able to share what I know after ten books (and three more this year). And since I regularly encourage you to tell your stories through the written medium, it is time for me to share some of my story.  I pray this contribution will assist you in equipping the Church for the multiplication of disciples, leaders, and churches among the 4 billion.

Lord willing, I’m going to write some periodic posts over the next few weeks on my philosophy and approach to writing. Stay tuned or subscribe to this blog so as not to miss them.

Here are some thoughts to get us started:

I enjoy writing. It is not always easy. It is not always fun. Sometimes it is fun. It is always a blessing to me.

I do not consider myself a great writer. I am prolific, but not great. I describe myself as average. I am always critiquing my style and trying to learn from others. I have much to learn.

Writing is art. Writing is Kingdom stewardship. It is an opportunity to sculpt a concept, an idea, a vision the Lord has placed within your heart and then make it public.

The only way to become a writer is to write. The best way to improve as a writer is to write. The way to develop your style is to write.

I have different writing styles. The style used for this blog is not found in any of my published books (yet). The styles found in my books are different from the style I use for an academic paper to be presented at a society meeting. And I use a different style when I write for my church family.

After I finished my doctoral studies, I wrote like a Ph.D. student for seven years before making necessary stylistic shifts. If you develop different styles, you will be able to connect with different audiences. These connections provide an opportunity for you to lead those audiences together that they may learn from one another.

I am a non-fiction writer. Don’t ask for my guidance on writing fiction. While I did fold a fictional narrative into Evangelism: A Biblical Response to Today’s Questions, I am far from writing novels. But who knows what may come (I do have an idea for a book about a witch, a wardrobe, and a lion, but I’m not ready to share that with you.).

———-

Last week on Strike the Match, Dean Merrill was my guest and we discussed urban missions and the new book he produced with Patrick Johnstone, Serving God in Today’s Cities: Facing the Challenge of Urbanization. Subscribe and listen: iTunes | Android | RSS

May
19

Carl Henry, Apostolic Task, and Blurring the Lines

written by JD

I met Carl F. H. Henry several years ago. He was one of the most influential theologians of the 20th century. I greatly admired him and deeply appreciated his stance for truth. Though his magnum opus is the massive 6-volume God, Revelation, and Authority, his brief book The Uneasy Conscience of Modern Fundamentalism has been read by more people.

There is so much excellent material packed in The Uneasy Conscience. My copy is filled with my notes and markings. Here is one of my favorite quotes from this book–a quote overlooked by most:

“Without purposing to minimize the foreign needs. . . . The distinction between home and foreign missions is a generation outmoded; Christianity again faces the apostolic task of seeking to transform an environment that is quite unilaterally hostile” (69).

The year was 1947.

We have listened to Henry on other matters. Maybe we should listen to him on this one too. If we need another 68 years to think it over, then that should make us more than uneasy.

———-

Last week on Strike the Match, Dean Merrill was my guest as we discussed urban missions and the new book he produced with Patrick Johnstone, Serving God in Today’s Cities: Facing the Challenge of Urbanization. Subscribe and listen: iTunes | Android | RSS

May
18

Shepherd Your People to the Marketplace

written by JD

Part of shepherding your people to the field means knowing about marketplace needs.

Countries often frown upon natives from other countries coming in and taking jobs–unless it has been difficult to find a national for the job.

Here are the ten-most difficult positions to fill across the world. Do you see the Kingdom possibilities for your people?

1.  Skilled Trades

2. Sales Representatives

3. Engineers

4. Technicians

5. Drivers

6.  Management/Executives

7.  Accounting and Finance Staff

8. Office Support Staff

9. IT Staff

10.  Production/Machine Operators

(source)

———-

Last week on Strike the Match, Dean Merrill was my guest as we discussed urban missions and the new book he produced with Patrick Johnstone, Serving God in Today’s Cities: Facing the Challenge of Urbanization. Subscribe and listen: iTunes | Android | RSS

May
17

New Church Planting Book

written by JD

Apostolic Church Planting CoverLast month I shared a glimpse of the cover of one of two books I’m publishing this year. I am extremely excited that Apostolic Church Planting is now available for pre-order.

This is my third work on the topic of church planting which builds from the foundational work established in Discovering Church Planting and the importance of the right team members noted in The Barnabas Factors.

I wrote this brief book with members of The Church at Brook Hills in mind. I wanted something concise, grounded in the Scriptures, practical, and helpful to our members as we commission and send them.

Over the past three years, we have embraced two expectations for our church planting teams whether they serve in Birmingham, across North America, or throughout the world:

1) Our teams are expected to embrace an apostolic approach rather than a plant-and-pastor model.

2) Our teams are expected to serve among unreached people groups rather than reached people groups.

Apostolic Church Planting: Birthing New Churches from New Believers addresses these two expectations and is unlike most of the church planting books on the market today.

I hope you will pre-order a copy and let others know about this book.

If you are interested in reviewing a draft for your blog, journal, podcast, or to post at Amazon, send me an email (jpayne@brookhills.org) no later than May 31. I’ll put you in contact with InterVarsity Press and see if they can get you a pre-release draft for review.

———-

We now live in an urban world. Last week on Strike the Match, Dean Merrill was my guest as we discussed urban missions and the new book he produced with Patrick Johnstone, Serving God in Today’s Cities: Facing the Challenge of Urbanization. Subscribe and listen: iTunes | Android | RSS

May
14

Serving God in Today’s Cities

written by JD

Strike the MatchDean Merrill, collaborating with Patrick Johnstone, recently published Serving God in Today’s Cities: Facing the Challenge of Urbanization. This book is a great introduction to our urban world and ministry today.

Three percent of the world’s population lived in cities in 1800. By 2100, 90% of the global population will live in cities. Most of this growth is happening in the Majority World.

And Dean Merrill notes that we are living in the first urban century with over 50% of the world’s population in the urban context.

In this episode of Strike the Match, Dean and I talk about this book and the urban world in which we live. Check out our conversation and share it with others.

May
13

Two Types of Busy

written by JD

One type of busy keeps you in constant motion. You are always going, doing, never stopping until you collapse in bed at night.

This kind of busy brings the praise of others, “Look at how busy he is!” But this kind of busy keeps you, and those you lead, in the status quo.

This busy allows no time for serious thought and prayer. It can also be an excuse for laziness. Oh, you’ll be doing a great deal of stuff, but not what is most important.

Remaining in the boat of status quo is comfortable as long as your world is smooth waters. But we live in the rapids and are approaching a waterfall.

The other type of busy gets more accomplished, has a multiplicative effect, and keeps you from constant motion. More is accomplished by less movement. More is accomplished by being still and knowing. This type of busy requires you to breathe. It is more focused and allows for reflection and prayer. And where there is much thought and prayer there is change.

This type of busy is dangerous. It causes a ruckus by pushing against the status quo. It sees the waterfall from miles away when everyone is saying “safe, safe,” and refuses to allow the boat near it.

———

What does innovation in missions look like? I addressed this topic last Friday on Strike the Match. Check it out on iTunes or RSS.

May
12

Don’t Wait for the How

written by JD

If we recognize we must now serve lunch at 7AM, then we come to the conclusion:  We must change the way we prepare others to serve in our blurred world.

Church planting training cannot remain as it is.

Pastoral training cannot remain as it is.

Seminary education cannot remain as it is.

Mission agencies cannot remain as they are.

And if navigating the change in training methodology is not difficult enough, we then have to recognize that many churches and institutions in the U. S. are just now figuring out how to sell 8-Tracks in a iPod world.

After prayer and fasting, where do you begin as a leader? Right where you are with what you’ve got.

Don’t wait for someone to show you how. The 4 billion remain.

———

What does innovation in missions look like? I addressed this topic last Friday on Strike the Match. Check it out on iTunes or RSS.

May
11

Telling Tales

written by JD

Do you regularly tell tales? Leaders tell well the magnificent tales.

Paul did this (2 Thess 1:4).  I do this.

“The lips of the wise spread knowledge” (Prov 15:7, ESV).

What are you going to tell today?

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What does innovation in missions look like? I addressed this topic last Friday on Strike the Match. Check it out on iTunes or RSS.

May
9

Lunch Now Served at 7AM

written by JD

I drove through my hometown yesterday and saw a Taco Bell sign: “Lunch now served at 7AM”.

Why did it take this Taco Bell so long to figure out that some lunch breaks are at 7 AM, not to mention the fact that some people like tacos and chalupas for breakfast?

We live in a day of blurred boundaries.

Things shift. Things change. Structures adjust. The taco shells must now be ready to go at the crack of dawn. Eggs alone are not sufficient.

When I read this announcement, I could not help but think of the fact that the Church in the West still has not understood that the lines between home and abroad blurred a long time ago. We do not have to cross the ocean to meet someone from an unreached people group from Asia, Africa, or South/Middle America. Cross cultural work is here and there.

When will our missiology, structures, organizations, and strategies shift?

This Taco Bell was late to the game with their service. We have something much more valuable, but we’re still serving lunch at noon.

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Last week on Strike the Match I addressed the topic of Innovation and the Kingdom. Check it out on iTunes or RSS.

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